How to Choose the Best Wood for Kitchen Cabinets

How to Choose the Best Wood for Kitchen Cabinets

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As a focal point of a kitchen or bath, cabinets must be attractive, functional and durable. The best kitchen cabinets are custom made with high quality materials. Prefabricated or boxed cabinets are constructed of thinner, lower-quality materials, often overlapping with a wood veneer. The cabinets are constructed with a mixture of plywood and solid hardwood, and both materials matter when you choose what is best.

How to Choose the Best Wood for Kitchen Cabinets
How to Choose the Best Wood for Kitchen Cabinets

 

Wooden cabinets are attractive because of their distinctive and unique character. Some prefer the predictability of materials designed as thermofoil and laminated but if you want a natural look, nothing compares to the beautiful color variations and grain patterns found in real wood. Choosing the right wood species for your cabinets depends heavily on your personal style and budget preferences.

 

1. Maple

How to Choose the Best Wood for Kitchen Cabinets
Best Wood for Kitchen Cabinets (Maple)

Features

Maple is a hardwood that varies from almost white to colorful cream and has a fine and smooth grain.

Availability

Maple is a popular wooden choice because it is easily available and reasonably easy to work with.

Style

It can be used in traditional, transient, contemporary and modern styles depending on the style of the door, the soil, and the surrounding design elements.

Finishes

Because of its fine grain, the maple can be stained or painted with beautiful results.

 

2. Walnut

How to Choose the Best Wood for Kitchen Cabinets
Best Wood for Kitchen Cabinets (Walnut)

Features

The walnut is a hardwood with a significant variation of grain and color of creamy white to dark brown.

Availability

Walnut is considered a superior wood because it is not as readily available as other more common selections but it is reasonably easy to work with.

Style

Due to color variations, the walnut can be used in traditional, transient, contemporary coatings of a
A light finish will emphasize the beautiful variations of natural walnut color, while a dark finish gives a more consistent and classic look.

Finishes

A lightweight finish will accentuate the beautiful natural color variations of Walnut, while a dark finish gives it a more consistent and classic look.

 

3. Rift Oak

How to Choose the Best Wood for Kitchen Cabinets
Best Wood for Kitchen Cabinets (Rift Oak)

Features

Oak crack is a hardwood with a distinctive linear bead that can be used in a horizontal or vertical application and has a light yellowish color range to the tan creamy in its natural state.

Availability

Rift Oak is fairly common wood only slightly more expensive than regular oak due to additional work in milling and is reasonably easy to work with.

Style

Due to the linear grain and consistent color, the Rift oak is a popular choice for modern styles, but can also be used for traditional and transient styles depending on the style of the door, jacket and elements. Surrounding the project.

Finishes

The Rift oak is almost always stained, but all the pavement will allow the natural beauty of the characteristic linear grain to be shown through.

 

4. Clear Alder

How to Choose the Best Wood for Kitchen Cabinets
Best Wood for Kitchen Cabinets (Clear Alder)

Features

The transparent alder is of relatively soft wood, with a moderately fine and uniform grain. With the color ranging from light tan to reddish brown, clear alder is similar in appearance to cherry, but much softer that is useful when distressed and aged finishes occur. Unlike Cherry, Clear Alder becomes lighter with age and exposure to sunlight.

Availability

Clear Alder is a fairly common wood in the West because it is easily available and is a less expensive alternative to Cherry.

Style

Clear Alder is a popular choice for traditional and transitional styles and is a selection to go for a worn out or distressed look of the farm.

Finishes

Because it is soft, clear alder is easy to anguish and its fine grain looks beautiful when stained, glazed or painted.

 

5. Cherry

How to Choose the Best Wood for Kitchen Cabinets
Best Wood for Kitchen Cabinets (Cherry)

Features

Cherry is considered to be a hardwood but is softer than other woods in this category. It has a rich grain with occasional small pin knots and tread marks and is often associated with high-end woodworking.

Availability

Cherry is a fairly common wood because it is easily available but is typically more expensive than clear alder and lip.

Style

Cherry has a timeless and classic look often used in traditional offices, libraries and kitchens.

Finishes

The cherry is lent to reddish and brown spots and is associated with a dark and rich appearance.

 

6. Knotty Alder

How to Choose the Best Wood for Kitchen Cabinets
Best Wood for Kitchen Cabinets (Knotty Alder)

Features

Knotty Alder is a relatively soft wood, typically with us everywhere. These natural characteristics, combined with dents and teeth of distressing and accumulated over time, make this wood a popular option for a rustic look.

Availability

Knotty Alder is a common wood in the West because it is readily available.

Style

Knotty Alder is less popular than it used to be, but it is still used to achieve a rustic look and often combined with a worn or worn finish.

Finishes

Because it is soft, knotty alder is easy to anguish and looks beautiful when stained, glazed or painted.

 

7. Oak

How to Choose the Best Wood for Kitchen Cabinets
Best Wood for Kitchen Cabinets (Oak)

Features

The oak is a very hard wood that is light brown to medium and has a coarse and uneven grain.

Availability

Oak is easily available and is a less expensive alternative to Rift oak.

Style

The oak cabinets are associated with an old and outdated style, but the new finishes (and the lowest price point) have given this kind of wood a modest increase in popularity.

Finishes

The oak has traditionally been stained, but the new paint finishes allow the distinctive sand to be presented in an updated look.

 

Other Tips

Keep in mind that the colors and grain patterns of each wood species are affected by the environment in which they are cultivated. These natural wood features make it impossible to guarantee that all the wooden pieces inside a kitchen match perfectly with the grain pattern and the color. This organic variety is what makes natural wood products so attractive.

The finishing process enhances and protects the natural beauty of wood, highlights the inherent qualities of genuine wood to create an attractive and functional product. Each species of wood used has its own unique characteristics, and some species and color combinations accentuate the variations of color and natural wood grain even more. In addition, the texture of grains and mineral composition in individual pieces of wood can also vary in uniform and consistent with varied and dramatic. All these factors combine to create distinctive beauty that makes genuine wooden cabinets so desirable.

Ultraviolet inhibitors in coatings slow the effects of aging of sunlight and fluorescent lighting; However, long-term exposure to these light sources will ultimately change the appearance of any wood. The effects of this aging will occur in all wood species but are seen more quickly in cherry, Alder, and maple.

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