Recipe: Yummy Japanese Hito-kuchi Katsu (mini deep fried pork cutlets)

Japanese Hito-kuchi Katsu (mini deep-fried pork cutlets). Work one piece at a time. Dip the meat in the egg mix first, flip to coat both sides, move it to the panko plate and press the panko on both sides - place it on a clean plate and move on to the next piece. Pork katsu, a staple Japanese dish, is a deep-fried pork cutlet on top of rice that is traditionally served with simple shredded cabbage.

Recipe: Yummy Japanese Hito-kuchi Katsu (mini deep fried pork cutlets)
Tonkatsu is easy to make at home. Mark Bittman has a recipe that I like in The Best Recipes in the World. It's pan-fried, not deep-fried, although he says you can deep fry them if you want. You can have Japanese Hito-kuchi Katsu (mini deep-fried pork cutlets) using 6 ingredients and 10 steps. Here is how you achieve that.

Ingredients of Japanese Hito-kuchi Katsu (mini deep fried pork cutlets)

  1. It's 1 lb of pork tenderloin.
  2. You need 8 tablespoons of all-purpose flour.
  3. You need 1 large egg.
  4. It's 10 tablespoons of panko (buy “panko” not “bread crumbles”).
  5. Prepare Salt and Pepper for taste.
  6. You need Olive oil for frying.

Although it has branched out into all sorts of deep-fried dishes like shrimp, ground beef patties, pork rolled with shiso leaf and cheese, and other seasonal options, Wako's specialty is and shall remain its pork. Dip the pork into the flour to coat. Dip into the beaten egg, letting excess drip off, then dip into the panko breadcrumbs, patting to coat evenly. Tonkatsu is a panko-breaded, deep-fried pork cutlet.

Japanese Hito-kuchi Katsu (mini deep-fried pork cutlets) step by step

  1. Slice the tenderloin diagonally, each piece should be an inch thick, palm-size (or smaller)..
  2. Pound the meat with a meat mallet to make the thickness even.
  3. Salt and pepper very lightly on both sides of the meat then coat each piece with flour. (I do steps 1-3 on the same cutting board).
  4. Beat the egg in a bowl - add 1-2 tablespoon water and mix it well, on a large plate, spread out panko. Set both aside.
  5. Work one piece at a time. Dip the meat in the egg mix first, flip to coat both sides, move it to the panko plate, and press the panko on both sides - place it on a clean plate and move on to the next piece.
  6. Heat the oil in a large deep skillet (you don’t need a lot of oil, 1-2 inches would be enough). Drop a piece of panko and if it touches the bottom of your pan for 1 sec and floats with small bubbles, the oil is at the right temperature!.
  7. When the oil is hot, put the meat in the oil - don’t overcrowd the pan and don’t touch them until it starts moving around by itself in the pan.
  8. When the meat starts moving around and floating in the oil, you can flip it. Cook the other side until both sides become golden brown (3-4 mins on each side).
  9. Rest the fried pieces on the paper towel-lined rack while cooking the rest of the pieces so that you can get rid of excess oil.
  10. Serve with Okonomi sauce! (which you can find online on Rakuten).

Like the curry rice, I posted last time, tonkatsu (called donkkaseu in Korea, 돈까쓰 or 돈가스 ) is another dish that made its way into Korea by way of Japan and became widely popular. The Japanese adapted their version from the West. Katsuya: Japanese pork cutlets in Coquitlam. Katsuya is a Japanese restaurant located in Coquitlam near Lougheed (K-town). They specialize in tonkatsu, deep-fried pork cutlets.

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